"Science is a horizon to search for, not a prize to hold in your hand."

Neil deGrasse Tyson (as Waddles from Gravity Falls)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Klari Reis

From A Daily Dish

A Catalog of 365 Petri Dishes

leelinschin:

hello i’d just like to alert you all to this photograph of sir david attenborough holding a frillnecked lizard

leelinschin:

hello i’d just like to alert you all to this photograph of sir david attenborough holding a frillnecked lizard

thedemon-hauntedworld:

UGC 1810 The Rose Galaxy

Credit: NASA/Hubble, Mehdi Bozzo-Rey

andolefry:

teachers who leave stray marks on the board when they’re erasing it are out of control and need to be stopped

micdotcom:

Photographer creates gorgeous and empowering images of one-handed daughter

New Zealand-based photographer Holly Spring has stumbled upon a foolproof formula for capturing beauty: whimsical scenery, a realistic blend of photography and digital art, and her remarkable, one-handed daughter, Violet.

Spring recently shot a striking portrait series of 4-year-old Violet, who suffered early in life with Hirschsprung’s Disease and is missing her left hand. The series has rightfully gained recognition for both its composition — which earned Spring the NZIPP/Epson Iris Portrait Creative Photographer of the Year award in 2014 — and its positive message. While Violet may not be fully able-bodied, Spring said she wants her to understand her limitless potential. 

See more | Follow micdotcom 

ri-science:

How to make a homemade lava lamp with some water, oil, food colouring and Alka-Seltzer tablets!

Lovely activity to explore floating, sinking and density with your children. Watch the full video and download the worksheet here.

thenewenlightenmentage:

There Is No Now
What goes on when you see something, say, this book you are reading? Leaving aside the whole business of how the brain processes visual information, let’s just focus on the information travel time. To make life simple, let’s also just consider the classical propagation of light, ignoring for now how atoms absorb and reemit light. Light is bouncing around the room because either the window is open or the lamp is on, or both. This bouncing light hits the surface of the book, and some of it is absorbed, while some is reflected outwards in different directions. The page and the ink used for printing absorb and emit light in different ways, and these differences are encoded in the reflected light. A fraction of this reflected light then travels from the book to your eyes, and thanks to the brain’s wondrous ability to decode sensorial information, you see the words on the book’s page.
It all looks instantaneous to you. You say, “I’m reading this word now.” In reality, you aren’t. Since light travels at a finite speed, it takes time for it to bounce from the book to your eye. When you see a word, you are seeing it as it looked some time in the past. To be precise, if you are holding the book at one foot from your eye, the light travel time from the book to your eye is about one nanosecond, or one billionth of a second. The same with every object you see or person you talk to. Take a look around. You may think that you are seeing all these objects at once, or “now,” even if they are at different distances from you. But you really aren’t, as light bouncing from each one of them will take a different time to catch your eye. The brain integrates the different sources of visual information, and since the differences in arrival time are much smaller than what your eyes can discern and your brain process, you don’t see a difference. The “present”—the sum total of the sensorial input we say is happening “now”—is nothing but a convincing illusion.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

There Is No Now

What goes on when you see something, say, this book you are reading? Leaving aside the whole business of how the brain processes visual information, let’s just focus on the information travel time. To make life simple, let’s also just consider the classical propagation of light, ignoring for now how atoms absorb and reemit light. Light is bouncing around the room because either the window is open or the lamp is on, or both. This bouncing light hits the surface of the book, and some of it is absorbed, while some is reflected outwards in different directions. The page and the ink used for printing absorb and emit light in different ways, and these differences are encoded in the reflected light. A fraction of this reflected light then travels from the book to your eyes, and thanks to the brain’s wondrous ability to decode sensorial information, you see the words on the book’s page.

It all looks instantaneous to you. You say, “I’m reading this word now.” In reality, you aren’t. Since light travels at a finite speed, it takes time for it to bounce from the book to your eye. When you see a word, you are seeing it as it looked some time in the past. To be precise, if you are holding the book at one foot from your eye, the light travel time from the book to your eye is about one nanosecond, or one billionth of a second. The same with every object you see or person you talk to. Take a look around. You may think that you are seeing all these objects at once, or “now,” even if they are at different distances from you. But you really aren’t, as light bouncing from each one of them will take a different time to catch your eye. The brain integrates the different sources of visual information, and since the differences in arrival time are much smaller than what your eyes can discern and your brain process, you don’t see a difference. The “present”—the sum total of the sensorial input we say is happening “now”—is nothing but a convincing illusion.

Continue Reading

child-of-thecosmos:

Radio and television broadcasting may be only a brief passing phase in our technological development. When we imagine alien civilizations broadcasting signals with radio telescopes, are we any different from earlier generations who imagined riding cannon shells to the moon? Civilizations even slightly more advanced than ours may have already moved on to some other mode of communication, one that we have yet to discover or even imagine. Their messages could be swirling all around us at this very moment, but we lack the means to perceive them just as all of our ancestors, up to a little more than a century ago, would have been oblivious to the most urgent radio signal from another world. 

But there’s another more troubling possibility: Civilizations, like other living things, may only live so long before perishing due to natural causes, or violence, or self-inflicted wounds. Whether or not we ever make contact with intelligent alien life may depend on a critical question: What is the life expectancy of a civilization?

- Episode 11: The Immortals, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

"I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and reinvigorate it."

Robert M. Sapolsky (via pridejoyetc)